Text Box: 	    The VOICE 
“Working together to make the difference that matters.”

TO WIN     TO COMMIT     TO GROW     TO UNITE
Text Box: North Eaton Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
35895 Royalton Rd.                                                                                                                                           Grafton, Ohio 44044
Address Service Requested                





Minister: Dr. Paul H. Durbin
Licensed Minister: Judy Ponting
Christian Ed. And Youth Director: Polly Tallos
Secretary: Londa Blaine				
Pathways Counseling and Growth Center: Dr. Ralph Thompson
Choir Director: Kyle VanderSchrier
Pianist: Carla McElhaney
www.neccdisciples.com
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Text Box: NON PROFIT ORG
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
Grafton, OH 44044
Permit No. 8
Text Box: Paul’s Place—February 2007
LEARNING FRENCH
	Mixed into the English, Irish, and Scot heritage, (some denied German in the form of                  Pennsylvania Dutch which only came to light for me in the last decade), there is some French.                    A few centuries back, Laceyville, Pennsylvania was named after those French relatives of mine,                de Lacey.  I already speak a form of English.  The language of my Scot-Irish heritage was never taught in school.  I can say, “Hoot man” and things like, “Top of the morning to ya”, but that’s the extent of it.  When it came time to take a foreign language in school, I picked French.  The school offered a choice of French, German, or Spanish.   I am proud of my French heritage.  I took two years of French in high school, which enabled me to say “yes,” and “no” in French.  I learned to  count and to conduct a  prescribed conversation with another person as long as the other person  responded with the same words that were used in the text.  In college, I took French again.  It was a whole different experience.  I ended up in classes on conversational French and did pretty well at it.  I was even dreaming in French. (As long as all the speaking was in the dream and no one checking it, I spoke it very well).  Actually, I did very well in the French classes I took.  I ended up working in the language lab as one of the assistants to the professor.  I even got to grade some French papers from the first year students.  I enjoyed learning another language.
	“What’s the French word for ‘Here’?” Michaelene will ask me, as she sits at the kitchen table working a crossword puzzle.  A little later, she’ll ask, “How do you say ‘she’ in French?”  “How do you say ‘close’? ‘open’? ‘stand’? ‘come’?”  I dazzle her with my command of the language of my ancestry.  I amaze her with my perfect memory of things I learned long ago.  “Dazzle and amaze” may be an over statement, but I am most helpful when it comes to crossword puzzles.  As to my ability to speak the limited amount of French that I once did, those days are long gone.  My memory is limited to crossword puzzles and maybe some games of trivial knowledge.  If I had continued to work at learning and speaking French and had not left it alone after graduation day, I would be able to speak it today.  It takes practice.  It takes work.  It takes serious discipline.  There were other things that occupied those parts of my character and time.  
	Learning and retaining my knowledge of the French language is of     little consequence compared to my learning and growing in the Christian faith.  It takes serious discipline, consistent practice, and the desire to become more than a resource for crossword puzzle questions on Christian and Biblical facts.